Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBlonigen, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSmelson, David
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorBaldwin, Nicole
dc.contributor.authorMcInnes, D Keith
dc.contributor.authorRaikov, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Jillian
dc.contributor.authorHyde, Justeen
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-02T21:15:40Z
dc.date.available2023-02-02T21:15:40Z
dc.date.issued2022-12-19
dc.identifier.citationBlonigen D, Smelson D, Smith J, Baldwin N, McInnes DK, Raikov I, Weber J, Hyde J. Peer support and whole health coaching to address the healthcare needs of homeless veterans: a pilot study. BMC Prim Care. 2022 Dec 19;23(1):331. doi: 10.1186/s12875-022-01927-0. PMID: 36529718; PMCID: PMC9760553.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2731-4553
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12875-022-01927-0en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36529718
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51642
dc.description.abstractBackground: Homelessness is a robust social determinant of acute care service utilization among veterans. Although intensive outpatient programs have been developed for homeless veterans who are high utilizers of acute care ("super utilizers"), few scalable programs have been implemented to address their needs. Objective: Describe the development and pilot testing of a novel intervention that integrates the roles of a peer and whole health coach ("Peer-WHC") in coordination with primary care teams to reduce homeless veterans' frequent use of acute care. Design: Single-arm trial in three outpatient primary care clinics at a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) medical center; pre/post design using mixed-methods. Participants: Twenty veterans from VHA's homeless registry who were super-utilizers of acute care and enrolled in primary care. Intervention: Weekly health coaching sessions with a peer over 12 weeks, including discussions of patients' health care utilization patterns and coordination with primary care. Main measures: Rates of session attendance and intervention fidelity, patient-reported satisfaction and changes in patient engagement and perceptions of health, pre/post utilization of acute and supportive care services, and qualitative interviews with multiple stakeholders to identify barriers and facilitators to implementation. Key results: On average, patients attended 6.35 sessions (SD = 3.5, Median = 7). Satisfaction scores (M = 28.75 out of 32; SD = 2.79) exceeded a priori benchmarks. Patients' perceptions of health improved from pre to post [t(df)=-2.26(14), p = 0.04]. In the 3-months pre/post, 45% (n = 9) and 15% (n = 3) of patients, respectively, were hospitalized. Qualitative feedback from patients, providers, and peers and fidelity metrics suggested value in increasing the length of the intervention to facilitate goal-setting with patients and coordination with primary care. Conclusion: Findings support the feasibility, acceptability, and utility of Peer-WHC to address the healthcare needs of homeless veterans. A future trial is warranted to test the impact of Peer-WHC on reducing these patients' frequent use of acute care.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Primary Careen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12875-022-01927-0en_US
dc.rightsThis is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativeco mmons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAcute careen_US
dc.subjectHomelessnessen_US
dc.subjectPeersen_US
dc.subjectPrimary careen_US
dc.subjectVeteransen_US
dc.titlePeer support and whole health coaching to address the healthcare needs of homeless veterans: a pilot studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleBMC primary care
dc.source.volume23
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage331
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland
dc.identifier.journalBMC primary care
refterms.dateFOA2023-02-02T21:15:41Z
dc.contributor.departmentMedicineen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
s12875-022-01927-0.pdf
Size:
1.714Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2022. Open
Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation,
distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source,
provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this
article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is
not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the
permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativeco
mmons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/
zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is a U.S. Government work and not under copyright protection in the US; foreign copyright protection may apply 2022. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativeco mmons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/ zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.