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dc.contributor.advisorNancy Morrisen_US
dc.contributor.authorNyakako, Rose Marie
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-02T16:18:39Z
dc.date.available2023-03-02T16:18:39Z
dc.date.issued2022-12-15
dc.identifier.doi10.13028/zz0h-3p13en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51733
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To describe U.S. Jamaican diasporan and first-generation Jamaican Americans knowledge of and stigma towards mental illness. SPECIFIC AIMS: 1. Describe U.S. dwelling Jamaican diaspora and first-generation Jamaican Americans knowledge of mental illness and stigma towards mental illness with identification of drivers and facilitators of stigma. 2. Elicit descriptors used by Jamaican diaspora and first-generation Jamaican Americans to describe mental illness. 3. Determine association of mental illness stigma and mental illness knowledge, to age, gender, education, employment, religiosity, years living in the U.S., socioeconomic status, personal history of mental illness, and family member with mental illness. FRAMEWORK: The Health Stigma and Discrimination Framework. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive survey. RESULTS: Jamaican diaspora years have less knowledge (mean 97.25, SD 10.27) than Jamaican Americans (mean 104.24, SD 7.74; p =.001). Participants > 40 years had less knowledge (mean 97.05, SD 9.54) than those < 40 years (mean 102.08, SD 10.95; p =.003). Jamaican diaspora years have more stigma (mean -.52, SD .76) than Jamaican Americans (mean -1.10, SD .73; p < .001). Participants > 40 years had more stigma (mean -.48, SD .69) than those < 40 years (mean 1.02, SD .87; p <.001). CONCLUSION: Older adults have less knowledge of mental illness and more stigma. Jamaican diaspora has less knowledge and more stigma than First-generation Jamaican Americans. Greater mental illness knowledge is associated with less stigma providing support for ongoing efforts to increase public knowledge of mental illness with added emphasis on word choice/terms used when talking about people with mental illness. PURPOSE: To describe U.S. Jamaican diasporan and first-generation Jamaican Americans knowledge of and stigma towards mental illness. SPECIFIC AIMS: 1. Describe U.S. dwelling Jamaican diaspora and first-generation Jamaican Americans knowledge of mental illness and stigma towards mental illness with identification of drivers and facilitators of stigma. 2. Elicit descriptors used by Jamaican diaspora and first-generation Jamaican Americans to describe mental illness. 3. Determine association of mental illness stigma and mental illness knowledge, to age, gender, education, employment, religiosity, years living in the U.S., socioeconomic status, personal history of mental illness, and family member with mental illness. FRAMEWORK: The Health Stigma and Discrimination Framework. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive survey. RESULTS: Jamaican diaspora years have less knowledge (mean 97.25, SD 10.27) than Jamaican Americans (mean 104.24, SD 7.74; p =.001). Participants > 40 years had less knowledge (mean 97.05, SD 9.54) than those < 40 years (mean 102.08, SD 10.95; p =.003). Jamaican diaspora years have more stigma (mean -.52, SD .76) than Jamaican Americans (mean -1.10, SD .73; p < .001). Participants > 40 years had more stigma (mean -.48, SD .69) than those < 40 years (mean 1.02, SD .87; p <.001). CONCLUSION: Older adults have less knowledge of mental illness and more stigma. Jamaican diaspora has less knowledge and more stigma than First-generation Jamaican Americans. Greater mental illness knowledge is associated with less stigma providing support for ongoing efforts to increase public knowledge of mental illness with added emphasis on word choice/terms used when talking about people with mental illness.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherUMass Chan Medical Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 Nyakakoen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectJamaican-diasporaen_US
dc.subjectJamaican-Americanen_US
dc.subjectMental illness Stigmaen_US
dc.subjectMental Health Literacyen_US
dc.subjectDrivers of Stigmaen_US
dc.subjectFacilitators of Stigmaen_US
dc.titleMental Illness Knowledge and Stigma of Jamaican Diaspora & First-Generation Jamaican Americansen_US
dc.typeDoctoral Dissertationen_US
atmire.contributor.authoremailRosemarie.nyakako@umassmed.eduen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTan Chingfen Graduate School of Nursingen_US
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-7232-3752en_US


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