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dc.contributor.authorShin, Masahiro
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Nathan D
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-14T16:46:53Z
dc.date.available2023-03-14T16:46:53Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-16
dc.identifier.citationShin M, Lawson ND. Back and forth: History of and new insights on the vertebrate lymphatic valve. Dev Growth Differ. 2021 Dec;63(9):523-535. doi: 10.1111/dgd.12757. Epub 2021 Nov 16. PMID: 34716915; PMCID: PMC9299638.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1440-169X
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/dgd.12757en_US
dc.identifier.pmid34716915
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51809
dc.description.abstractLymphatic valves develop from pre-existing endothelial cells through a step-wise process involving complex changes in cell shape and orientation, along with extracellular matrix interactions, to form two intraluminal leaflets. Once formed, valves prevent back-flow within the lymphatic system to ensure drainage of interstitial fluid back into the circulatory system, thereby serving a critical role in maintaining fluid homeostasis. Despite the extensive anatomical characterization of lymphatic systems across numerous genus and species dating back several hundred years, valves were largely thought to be phylogenetically restricted to mammals. Accordingly, most insights into molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in lymphatic valve development have derived from mouse knockouts, as well as rare diseases in humans. However, we have recently used a combination of imaging and genetic analysis in the zebrafish to demonstrate that valves are a conserved feature of the teleost lymphatic system. Here, we provide a historical overview of comparative lymphatic valve anatomy together with recent efforts to define molecular pathways that contribute to lymphatic valve morphogenesis. Finally, we integrate our findings in zebrafish with previous work and highlight the benefits that this model provides for investigating lymphatic valve development.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopment, Growth & Differentiationen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1111/dgd.12757en_US
dc.rightsThis is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.© 2021 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologistsen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectlymphatic systemen_US
dc.subjectlymphatic valveen_US
dc.subjectlymphatic vesselen_US
dc.subjectzebrafishen_US
dc.titleBack and forth: History of and new insights on the vertebrate lymphatic valveen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleDevelopment, growth & differentiation
dc.source.volume63
dc.source.issue9
dc.source.beginpage523
dc.source.endpage535
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryJapan
dc.identifier.journalDevelopment, growth & differentiation
refterms.dateFOA2023-03-14T16:46:54Z
dc.contributor.departmentMolecular, Cell and Cancer Biologyen_US


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This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.© 2021 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.© 2021 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists