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dc.contributor.authorChatterjee, Deepshikha
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Gabrielle A
dc.contributor.authorVarvayanis, Susi Sturzenegger
dc.contributor.authorWefes, Inge
dc.contributor.authorChalkley, Roger
dc.contributor.authorNogueira, Ana T
dc.contributor.authorFuhrmann, Cynthia N
dc.contributor.authorVaradarajan, Janani
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, Nisaan M
dc.contributor.authorGaines, Christiann H
dc.contributor.authorLayton, Rebekah L
dc.contributor.authorChaudhary, Sunita
dc.date.accessioned2023-03-22T19:55:30Z
dc.date.available2023-03-22T19:55:30Z
dc.date.issued2023-03-01
dc.identifier.citationChatterjee D, Jacob GA, Varvayanis SS, Wefes I, Chalkley R, Nogueira AT, Fuhrmann CN, Varadarajan J, Hubbard NM, Gaines CH, Layton RL, Chaudhary S. Career self-efficacy disparities in underrepresented biomedical scientist trainees. PLoS One. 2023 Mar 1;18(3):e0280608. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0280608. PMID: 36857379; PMCID: PMC9977038.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0280608en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36857379
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51869
dc.description.abstractThe present study examines racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in career self-efficacy amongst 6077 US citizens and US naturalized graduate and postdoctoral trainees. Respondents from biomedical fields completed surveys administered by the National Institutes of Health Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (NIH BEST) programs across 17 US institutional sites. Graduate and postdoctoral demographic and survey response data were examined to evaluate the impact of intersectional identities on trainee career self-efficacy. The study hypothesized that race, ethnicity and gender, and the relations between these identities, would impact trainee career self-efficacy. The analysis demonstrated that racial and ethnic group, gender, specific career interests (academic principal investigator vs. other careers), and seniority (junior vs. senior trainee level) were, to various degrees, all associated with trainee career self-efficacy and the effects were consistent across graduate and postdoctoral respondents. Implications for differing levels of self-efficacy are discussed, including factors and events during training that may contribute to (or undermine) career self-efficacy. The importance of mentorship for building research and career self-efficacy of trainees is discussed, especially with respect to those identifying as women and belonging to racial/ethnic populations underrepresented in biomedical sciences. The results underscore the need for change in the biomedical academic research community in order to retain a diverse biomedical workforce.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding sources included the Common Fund NIH Director’s Biomedical Research Workforce Innovation Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) Award (authors served as PI/Co-Is and/or Program Directors). The following institutional NIH BEST awards included: DP7OD018425 (Cornell University, SSV); DP7OD020314 (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, SC); DP7OD020317 (Vanderbilt University, RC); DP7OD018422 (CU Denver|Anschutz Medical Campus, IW); DP7OD020317 (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, UNC; RLL), DP7OD018421 (University of Massachusetts, CNF); DP7OD020317 (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill UNC; RLL); as well as the National Institutes of Health General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) - Science of Science Policy Approach to Analyzing and Innovation the Biomedical Research Enterprise (SCISIPBIO) Award (GM-19-011) - 1R01GM140282-01 (UNC, RLL); and the National Cancer Institute NCI3P30 CA072720-20 (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, SC). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPloS Oneen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0280608en_US
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2023 Chatterjee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectcareers in researchen_US
dc.subjecttraineesen_US
dc.subjectbiomedical researchen_US
dc.titleCareer self-efficacy disparities in underrepresented biomedical scientist traineesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePloS one
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpagee0280608
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalPloS one
refterms.dateFOA2023-03-22T19:55:31Z
dc.contributor.departmentBiochemistry and Molecular Biotechnologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentRNA Therapeutics Instituteen_US


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Copyright: © 2023 Chatterjee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2023 Chatterjee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.