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dc.contributor.authorReilly, Erin Dawna
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Stephanie A
dc.contributor.authorPetrakis, Beth Ann
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Melissa M
dc.contributor.authorWiener, Renda Soylemez
dc.contributor.authorCastaneda-Sceppa, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorQuigley, Karen S
dc.date.accessioned2023-04-25T13:26:24Z
dc.date.available2023-04-25T13:26:24Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-09
dc.identifier.citationReilly ED, Robinson SA, Petrakis BA, Gardner MM, Wiener RS, Castaneda-Sceppa C, Quigley KS. Mobile Intervention to Improve Sleep and Functional Health of Veterans With Insomnia: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Form Res. 2021 Dec 9;5(12):e29573. doi: 10.2196/29573. PMID: 34889746; PMCID: PMC8704109.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2561-326X
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/29573en_US
dc.identifier.pmid34889746
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/51978
dc.description.abstractBackground: Insomnia is a prevalent and debilitating disorder among veterans. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) can be effective for treating insomnia, although many cannot access this care. Technology-based solutions and lifestyle changes, such as physical activity (PA), offer affordable and accessible self-management alternatives to in-person CBTI. Objective: This study aims to extend and replicate prior pilot work to examine whether the use of a mobile app for CBTI (cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia coach app [CBT-i Coach]) improves subjective and objective sleep outcomes. This study also aims to investigate whether the use of the CBT-i Coach app with adjunctive PA improves sleep outcomes more than CBT-i Coach alone. Methods: A total of 33 veterans (mean age 37.61 years, SD 9.35 years) reporting chronic insomnia were randomized to use either the CBT-i Coach app alone or the CBT-i Coach app with a PA intervention over 6 weeks, with outcome measures of objective and subjective sleep at pre- and posttreatment. Results: Although the PA manipulation was unsuccessful, both groups of veterans using the CBT-i Coach app showed significant improvement from baseline to postintervention on insomnia (P<.001), sleep quality (P<.001), and functional sleep outcomes (P=.002). Improvements in subjective sleep outcomes were similar in those with and without posttraumatic stress disorder and mild-to-moderate sleep apnea. We also observed a significant but modest increase in objective sleep efficiency (P=.02). Conclusions: These findings suggest that the use of a mobile app-delivered CBTI is feasible and beneficial for improving sleep outcomes in veterans with insomnia, including those with comorbid conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder or mild-to-moderate sleep apnea. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03305354; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03305354.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJMIR Formative Researchen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.2196/29573en_US
dc.rights©Erin Dawna Reilly, Stephanie A Robinson, Beth Ann Petrakis, Melissa M Gardner, Renda Soylemez Wiener, Carmen Castaneda-Sceppa, Karen S Quigley. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 09.12.2021. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectcognitive behavioral therapyen_US
dc.subjectinsomniaen_US
dc.subjectmobile appen_US
dc.subjectphysical activityen_US
dc.titleMobile Intervention to Improve Sleep and Functional Health of Veterans With Insomnia: Randomized Controlled Trialen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJMIR formative research
dc.source.volume5
dc.source.issue12
dc.source.beginpagee29573
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryCanada
dc.identifier.journalJMIR formative research
refterms.dateFOA2023-04-25T13:26:25Z
dc.contributor.departmentPsychiatryen_US


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©Erin Dawna Reilly, Stephanie A Robinson, Beth Ann Petrakis, Melissa M Gardner, Renda Soylemez Wiener, Carmen
Castaneda-Sceppa, Karen S Quigley. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 09.12.2021.
This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License
(https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium,
provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information,
a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as ©Erin Dawna Reilly, Stephanie A Robinson, Beth Ann Petrakis, Melissa M Gardner, Renda Soylemez Wiener, Carmen Castaneda-Sceppa, Karen S Quigley. Originally published in JMIR Formative Research (https://formative.jmir.org), 09.12.2021. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work, first published in JMIR Formative Research, is properly cited. The complete bibliographic information, a link to the original publication on https://formative.jmir.org, as well as this copyright and license information must be included.