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dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Ashley
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Courtney
dc.contributor.authorAnasi, Chelsea
dc.contributor.authorCai, Casey Ruoying
dc.contributor.authorRaman, Shivani
dc.contributor.authorRossopoulos, Thanos
dc.contributor.authorCantu, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorStrenth, Chance
dc.contributor.authorDay, Philip G
dc.contributor.authorGimpel, Nora
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-30T19:39:22Z
dc.date.available2023-06-30T19:39:22Z
dc.date.issued2022-09-02
dc.identifier.citationHerrera A, Johnson C, Anasi C, Cai CR, Raman S, Rossopoulos T, Cantu K, Strenth C, Day PG, Gimpel N. Assessing the Factors That Influence Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Working With Medically Underserved Populations. PRiMER. 2022 Sep 2;6:35. doi: 10.22454/PRiMER.2022.266345. PMID: 36132539; PMCID: PMC9484529.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2575-7873
dc.identifier.doi10.22454/PRiMER.2022.266345en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36132539
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52210
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The needs of medically-underserved populations (MUPs) are consistently outpacing the number of physicians caring for them. Medical students' motivations toward working with MUPs consistently decline as they progress through medical school. Given the shortage of doctors caring for MUPs, the objective of our study was to further investigate factors that influence medical students' motivation to work with MUPs while they progress through their education. By identifying these elements, we hope to recommend identified factors within medical education that support the development of more physicians who care for MUPs. Methods: This cross-sectional study is an assessment of medical students at the University of Texas at Southwestern Medical School (UTSW). The study utilized the Medical Student Attitudes Toward the Underserved (MSATU), a validated survey that assesses medical student motivations toward the provision of medical care to MUPs. Surveys were administered at three time points selected to represent key transition points in medical education. Results: There was no significant difference between MSATU scores among the three time points. MSATU scores were higher among students who identified as female, had higher empathy, had higher value placed on teamwork, and had higher community-centeredness. MSATU scores were also higher among students planning to specialize in primary care compared to students planning to specialize in a non-primary care field (P=.239). Conclusion: This study identifies factors associated with high MSATU scores within UTSW medical education, including female identification, higher empathy score, higher emphasis on teamwork, higher community-centeredness, and plans to practice primary care. Additionally, the results support maintenance of MSATU scores across all three time points. Future research should examine individual-level data to determine whether individual students are maintaining their MSATU scores or if individual fluctuations are neutralized by group changes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPRiMERen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.22454/primer.2022.266345en_US
dc.rights© 2022 by the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine.en_US
dc.subjectCare for the Underserveden_US
dc.subjectSpecial Populations, Underserved or Minorityen_US
dc.subjectUndergraduate Medical Educationen_US
dc.titleAssessing the Factors That Influence Medical Students' Attitudes Toward Working With Medically Underserved Populationsen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePRiMER (Leawood, Kan.)
dc.source.volume6
dc.source.beginpage35
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalPRiMER (Leawood, Kan.)
dc.contributor.departmentFamily Medicine and Community Healthen_US


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