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dc.contributor.authorPaulat, Nicole S
dc.contributor.authorStorer, Jessica M
dc.contributor.authorMoreno-Santillán, Diana D
dc.contributor.authorOsmanski, Austin B
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Kevin A M
dc.contributor.authorGrimshaw, Jenna R
dc.contributor.authorKorstian, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorHalsey, Michaela
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Carlos J
dc.contributor.authorCrookshanks, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Jaquelyn
dc.contributor.authorSmit, Arian F A
dc.contributor.authorHubley, Robert
dc.contributor.authorRosen, Jeb
dc.contributor.authorTeeling, Emma C
dc.contributor.authorVernes, Sonja C
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Eugene
dc.contributor.authorPippel, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorHiller, Michael
dc.contributor.authorRojas, Danny
dc.contributor.authorDávalos, Liliana M
dc.contributor.authorLindblad-Toh, Kerstin
dc.contributor.authorKarlsson, Elinor K
dc.contributor.authorRay, David A
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-07T19:00:27Z
dc.date.available2023-07-07T19:00:27Z
dc.date.issued2023-04-18
dc.identifier.citationPaulat NS, Storer JM, Moreno-Santillán DD, Osmanski AB, Sullivan KAM, Grimshaw JR, Korstian J, Halsey M, Garcia CJ, Crookshanks C, Roberts J, Smit AFA, Hubley R, Rosen J, Teeling EC, Vernes SC, Myers E, Pippel M, Brown T, Hiller M; Zoonomia Consortium; Rojas D, Dávalos LM, Lindblad-Toh K, Karlsson EK, Ray DA. Chiropterans Are a Hotspot for Horizontal Transfer of DNA Transposons in Mammalia. Mol Biol Evol. 2023 May 2;40(5):msad092. doi: 10.1093/molbev/msad092. PMID: 37071810; PMCID: PMC10162687.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1537-1719
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/molbev/msad092en_US
dc.identifier.pmid37071810
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52249
dc.description.abstractHorizontal transfer of transposable elements (TEs) is an important mechanism contributing to genetic diversity and innovation. Bats (order Chiroptera) have repeatedly been shown to experience horizontal transfer of TEs at what appears to be a high rate compared with other mammals. We investigated the occurrence of horizontally transferred (HT) DNA transposons involving bats. We found over 200 putative HT elements within bats; 16 transposons were shared across distantly related mammalian clades, and 2 other elements were shared with a fish and two lizard species. Our results indicate that bats are a hotspot for horizontal transfer of DNA transposons. These events broadly coincide with the diversification of several bat clades, supporting the hypothesis that DNA transposon invasions have contributed to genetic diversification of bats.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Biology and Evolutionen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msad092en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.comen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/*
dc.subjectechidnaen_US
dc.subjectendogenous retrovirusen_US
dc.subjectfusogenic envelope proteinen_US
dc.subjectmonotremesen_US
dc.subjectplatypusen_US
dc.titleChiropterans Are a Hotspot for Horizontal Transfer of DNA Transposons in Mammaliaen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleMolecular biology and evolution
dc.source.volume40
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalMolecular biology and evolution
refterms.dateFOA2023-07-07T19:00:28Z
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicineen_US


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© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (https://
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium,
provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License (https:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com