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dc.contributor.authorLapane, Kate L
dc.contributor.authorLim, Emily
dc.contributor.authorMack, Deborah S
dc.contributor.authorHargraves, J Lee
dc.contributor.authorCosenza, Carol
dc.contributor.authorDubé, Catherine E
dc.date.accessioned2023-07-20T19:43:01Z
dc.date.available2023-07-20T19:43:01Z
dc.date.issued2023-05-30
dc.identifier.citationLapane KL, Lim E, Mack DS, Hargraves JL, Cosenza C, Dubé CE. Rising to the Occasion: A National Nursing Home Study Documenting Attempts to Address Social Isolation During the COVID-19 Pandemic. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2023 May 30:S1525-8610(23)00482-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2023.05.018. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 37355245; PMCID: PMC10227205.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1538-9375
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jamda.2023.05.018en_US
dc.identifier.pmid37355245
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52336
dc.description.abstractObjectives: COVID-19-related policies introduced extraordinary social disruption in nursing homes. In response, nursing facilities implemented strategies to alleviate their residents' loneliness. This study sought to describe interventions nursing homes used, document the perceived effectiveness of efforts, and determine barriers to implementing strategies to mitigate social isolation and loneliness. Design: National survey of nursing homes sampled in strata defined by facility size (beds: 30-99, 100+) and quality ratings (1, 2-4, 5). Settings and participants: US Nursing Home Directors of Nursing/Administrators (n = 1676). Methods: The survey was conducted between February and May 2022 (response rate: 30%; n = 504, weighted n = 14,506). Weighted analyses provided nationally representative results. Results: One-third were extremely concerned about their home's ability to meet residents' medical and social needs during COVID-19 before vaccines were available and 13% after vaccines. Nearly all reported trying to mitigate residents' social isolation during the pandemic. Efforts tried, and perceived as most useful, included using technology (tablets, phones, emails), assigning staff as a family contact, and more staff time with residents. Most frequently cited barriers to implementation were related to staffing issues. Conclusions and implications: Despite multiple challenges, nearly all nursing homes tried to implement many different approaches to address residents' social needs, with some (eg, having an assigned family contact, use of tablets and phones) perceived as more useful than others. Staffing issues presented barriers for addressing the social needs of nursing home residents. Many strategies for addressing social isolation placed more demands on a workforce already stretched to the limit. While concerns about resident social isolation reduced after vaccine availability, administrators remained extremely concerned about staff burnout and mental health.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Associationen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2023.05.018en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2023 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectLonelinessen_US
dc.subjectactivitiesen_US
dc.subjectsocial isolationen_US
dc.subjectstaff burnouten_US
dc.titleRising to the Occasion: A National Nursing Home Study Documenting Attempts to Address Social Isolation During the COVID-19 Pandemicen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
dc.contributor.departmentFamily Medicine and Community Healthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US


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