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dc.contributor.authorPepin, Michael D
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Jillian K
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Brittany P
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Christina
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Logan K
dc.contributor.authorMarano, Ryan L
dc.contributor.authorCarreiro, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Erik J
dc.contributor.authorSilk, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorBabu, Kavita M
dc.date.accessioned2023-08-29T19:05:52Z
dc.date.available2023-08-29T19:05:52Z
dc.date.issued2023-07-19
dc.identifier.citationPepin MD, Joseph JK, Chapman BP, McAuliffe C, O'Donnell LK, Marano RL, Carreiro SP, Garcia EJ, Silk H, Babu KM. A mobile addiction service for community-based overdose prevention. Front Public Health. 2023 Jul 19;11:1154813. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2023.1154813. PMID: 37538275; PMCID: PMC10394629.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn2296-2565
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpubh.2023.1154813en_US
dc.identifier.pmid37538275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52457
dc.description.abstractMainstays of opioid overdose prevention include medications for opioid use disorder (e.g., methadone or buprenorphine) and naloxone distribution. Inadequate access to buprenorphine limits its uptake, especially in communities of color, and people with opioid use disorders encounter multiple barriers to obtaining necessary medications including insurance, transportation, and consistent availability of telephones. UMass Memorial Medical Center and our community partners sought to alleviate these barriers to treatment through the deployment of a mobile addiction service, called the Road to Care. Using this approach, multidisciplinary and interprofessional providers deliver holistic addiction care by centering our patients' needs with respect to scheduling, location, and convenience. This program also extends access to buprenorphine and naloxone among people experiencing homelessness. Additional systemic and individualized barriers encountered are identified, as well as potential solutions for future mobile addiction service utilization. Over a two-year period, we have cared for 1,121 individuals who have accessed our mobile addiction service in over 4,567 encounters. We prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®) to 330 individuals (29.4% of all patients). We have distributed nearly 250 naloxone kits directly on-site or and more than 300 kits via prescriptions to local pharmacies. To date, 74 naloxone rescue attempts have been reported back to us. We have demonstrated that a community-based mobile addiction service, anchored within a major medical center, can provide high-volume and high-quality overdose prevention services that facilitate engagement with additional treatment. Our experience is described as a case study below.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Public Healthen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2023.1154813en_US
dc.rights© 2023 Pepin, Joseph, Chapman, McAuliffe, O’Donnell, Marano, Carreiro, Garcia, Silk and Babu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectaddictionen_US
dc.subjectcommunity healthen_US
dc.subjecthomelessnessen_US
dc.subjectmobile clinicen_US
dc.subjectmobile healthen_US
dc.subjectoverdoseen_US
dc.subjectsuboxone treatmenten_US
dc.titleA mobile addiction service for community-based overdose preventionen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in public health
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.beginpage1154813
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countrySwitzerland
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in public health
refterms.dateFOA2023-08-29T19:05:54Z
atmire.contributor.authoremailstephanie.carreiro@umassmed.edu
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFamily Medicine and Community Healthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentT.H. Chan School of Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.studentMichael Pepin
dc.contributor.studentRyan Marano


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© 2023 Pepin, Joseph, Chapman, McAuliffe,
O’Donnell, Marano, Carreiro, Garcia, Silk and
Babu. This is an open-access article distributed
under the terms of the Creative Commons
Attribution License (CC BY). The use,
distribution or reproduction in other forums is
permitted, provided the original author(s) and
the copyright owner(s) are credited and that
the original publication in this journal is cited,
in accordance with accepted academic
practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is
permitted which does not comply with these
terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2023 Pepin, Joseph, Chapman, McAuliffe, O’Donnell, Marano, Carreiro, Garcia, Silk and Babu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.