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dc.contributor.authorMagee, Matthew J
dc.contributor.authorKhakharia, Anjali
dc.contributor.authorGandhi, Neel R
dc.contributor.authorDay, Cheryl L
dc.contributor.authorKornfeld, Hardy
dc.contributor.authorRhee, Mary K
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Lawrence S
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-12T20:04:25Z
dc.date.available2023-09-12T20:04:25Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-01
dc.identifier.citationMagee MJ, Khakharia A, Gandhi NR, Day CL, Kornfeld H, Rhee MK, Phillips LS. Increased Risk of Incident Diabetes Among Individuals With Latent Tuberculosis Infection. Diabetes Care. 2022 Apr 1;45(4):880-887. doi: 10.2337/dc21-1687. PMID: 35168250; PMCID: PMC9016736.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1935-5548
dc.identifier.doi10.2337/dc21-1687en_US
dc.identifier.pmid35168250
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52488
dc.description.abstractObjective: In cross-sectional U.S. studies, patients with diabetes had twice the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with those without diabetes. However, whether LTBI contributes to diabetes risk is unknown. We used longitudinal data to determine if LTBI is associated with increased diabetes incidence. Research design and methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study among U.S. Veterans receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration from 2000 to 2015. Eligibility included all patients without preexisting diabetes who received a tuberculin skin test (TST) or interferon-γ release assay (IGRA). We excluded patients with a history of active TB and those diagnosed with diabetes before or within 2 years after LTBI testing. Patients were followed until diabetes diagnosis, death, or 2015. LTBI was defined as TST or IGRA positive. Incident diabetes was defined by use of ICD-9 codes in combination with a diabetes drug prescription. Results: Among 574,113 eligible patients, 5.3% received both TST/IGRA, 79.1% received TST only, and 15.6% received IGRA only. Overall, 6.6% had LTBI, and there were 2,535,149 person-years (PY) of follow-up after LTBI testing (median 3.2 years). The diabetes incidence rate (per 100,000 PY) was greater in patients with LTBI compared with those without (1,012 vs. 744; hazard ratio [HR] 1.4 [95% CI 1.3-1.4]). Increased diabetes incidence persisted after adjustment for covariates (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.2 [95% CI 1.2-1.3]) compared with those without LTBI. Among patients with LTBI, diabetes incidence was similar in those treated for LTBI compared with those who were not treated (aHR 1.0 [95% CI 0.9-1.1]). Conclusions: Comprehensive longitudinal data indicate that LTBI is associated with increased diabetes incidence. These results have implications for people with LTBI, ∼25% of the global population.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes Careen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.2337/dc21-1687en_US
dc.rights© 2022 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. More information is available at https://diabetesjournals. org/journals/pages/license.en_US
dc.titleIncreased Risk of Incident Diabetes Among Individuals With Latent Tuberculosis Infectionen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleDiabetes care
dc.source.volume45
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage880
dc.source.endpage887
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalDiabetes care
refterms.dateFOA2023-09-12T20:04:27Z
dc.contributor.departmentMedicineen_US


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