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dc.contributor.authorWang, Bo
dc.contributor.authorDeveaux, Lynette
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Yan
dc.contributor.authorSchieber, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorAdderley, Richard
dc.contributor.authorLemon, Stephenie C
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Jeroan J.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xiaoming
dc.contributor.authorForbes, Nikkiah
dc.contributor.authorNaar, Sylvie
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-29T15:02:09Z
dc.date.available2023-09-29T15:02:09Z
dc.date.issued2023-09-02
dc.identifier.citationWang B, Deveaux L, Guo Y, Schieber E, Adderley R, Lemon S, Allison J, Li X, Forbes N, Naar S. Effects of Teacher Training and Continued Support on the Delivery of an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention Program: Findings From a National Implementation Study in the Bahamas. Health Educ Behav. 2023 Sep 2:10901981231195881. doi: 10.1177/10901981231195881. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 37658728.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1552-6127
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/10901981231195881en_US
dc.identifier.pmid37658728
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52576
dc.description.abstractBackground: Few studies have investigated the effects of teacher training and continued support on teachers' delivery of evidence-based HIV prevention programs. We examined these factors in a national implementation study of an evidence-based HIV risk reduction intervention for adolescents in the sixth grade in the Bahamas. Methods: Data were collected from 126 grade 6 teachers and 3,118 students in 58 government elementary schools in the Bahamas in 2019-2021. This is a Hybrid Type III implementation study guided by the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, Sustainment (EPIS) model. Teachers attended 2-day training workshops. Trained school coordinators and peer mentors provided biweekly monitoring and mentorship. We used mixed-effects models to assess the effects of teacher training and continued support on implementation fidelity. Results: Teachers who received training in-person or both in-person and online taught the most core activities (27.0 and 27.2 of 35), versus only online training (21.9) and no training (14.9) (F = 15.27, p < .001). Teachers with an "excellent" or "very good" school coordinator taught more core activities than those with a "satisfactory" coordinator or no coordinator (29.2 vs. 27.8 vs. 19.3 vs. 14.8, F = 29.20, p < .001). Teachers with a "very good" mentor taught more core activities and sessions than those with a "satisfactory" mentor or no mentor (30.4 vs. 25.0 vs. 23.1; F = 7.20; p < .01). Teacher training, implementation monitoring, peer mentoring, teachers' self-efficacy, and school-level support were associated with implementation fidelity, which in turn was associated with improved student outcomes (HIV/AIDS knowledge, preventive reproductive health skills, self-efficacy, and intention to use protection). Conclusion: Teachers receiving in-person training and those having higher-rated school coordinator and mentor support taught a larger number of HIV prevention core activities. Effective teacher training, implementation monitoring, and peer mentoring are critical for improving implementation fidelity and student outcomes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Education & Behavioren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1177/10901981231195881en_US
dc.subjectHIV preventionen_US
dc.subjectevidenced-based interventionen_US
dc.subjectimplementation fidelityen_US
dc.subjectimplementation strategiesen_US
dc.subjectteacher trainingen_US
dc.subjectthe Bahamasen_US
dc.titleEffects of Teacher Training and Continued Support on the Delivery of an Evidence-Based HIV Prevention Program: Findings From a National Implementation Study in the Bahamasen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleHealth education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education
dc.source.beginpage10901981231195881
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalHealth education & behavior : the official publication of the Society for Public Health Education
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention Research Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiostatistics and Health Services Researchen_US


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