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dc.contributor.authorHerbert, Carly
dc.contributor.authorManabe, Yukari C
dc.contributor.authorFilippaios, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorLin, Honghuang
dc.contributor.authorWang, Biqi
dc.contributor.authorAchenbach, Chad
dc.contributor.authorKheterpal, Vik
dc.contributor.authorHartin, Paul
dc.contributor.authorSuvarna, Thejas
dc.contributor.authorHarman, Emma
dc.contributor.authorStamegna, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorRao, Lokinendi V
dc.contributor.authorHafer, Nathaniel
dc.contributor.authorBroach, John
dc.contributor.authorLuzuriaga, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Katherine A
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, David D
dc.contributor.authorSoni, Apurv
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-08T20:43:32Z
dc.date.available2024-01-08T20:43:32Z
dc.date.issued2023-11-16
dc.identifier.citationHerbert C, Manabe YC, Filippaios A, Lin H, Wang B, Achenbach C, Kheterpal V, Hartin P, Suvarna T, Harman E, Stamegna P, Rao LV, Hafer N, Broach J, Luzuriaga K, Fitzgerald KA, McManus DD, Soni A. Differential Viral Dynamics by Sex and Body Mass Index During Acute SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Results from a Longitudinal Cohort Study. Clin Infect Dis. 2023 Nov 16:ciad701. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciad701. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 37972270.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6591
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/cid/ciad701en_US
dc.identifier.pmid37972270
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/52924
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is evidence of an association of severe COVID-19 outcomes with increased body mass index (BMI) and male sex. However, few studies have examined the interaction between sex and BMI on SARS-CoV-2 viral dynamics. Methods: Participants conducted RT-PCR testing every 24-48 hours over a 15-day period. Sex and BMI were self-reported, and Ct values from E-gene were used to quantify viral load. Three distinct outcomes were examined using mixed effects generalized linear models, linear models, and logistic models, respectively: all Ct values (Model 1); nadir Ct value (model 2); and strongly detectable infection (at least one Ct value ≤28 during their infection) (Model 3). An interaction term between BMI and sex was included, and inverse logit transformations were applied to quantify the differences by BMI and sex using marginal predictions. Results: In total, 7,988 participants enrolled in this study, and 439 participants (Model 1) and 309 (Model 2 and 3) were eligible for these analyses. Among males, increasing BMI was associated with lower Ct values in a dose-response fashion. For participants with BMIs greater than 29, males had significantly lower Ct values and nadir Ct values than females. In total, 67.8% of males and 55.3% of females recorded a strongly detectable infection; increasing proportions of men had Ct values <28 with BMIs of 35 and 40. Conclusions: We observed sex-based dimorphism in relation to BMI and COVID-19 viral load. Further investigation is needed to determine the cause, clinical impact, and transmission implications of this sex-differential effect of BMI on viral load.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciad701en_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectCt valueen_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectViral loaden_US
dc.subjectbiological sexen_US
dc.subjectbody mass indexen_US
dc.subjectobesityen_US
dc.subjectUMCCTS fundingen_US
dc.titleDifferential Viral Dynamics by Sex and Body Mass Index During Acute SARS-CoV-2 Infection: Results from a Longitudinal Cohort Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalClinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Clinical and Translational Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMedicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMorningside Graduate School of Biomedical Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Molecular Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.studentCarly Herbert
dc.description.thesisprogramMD/PhD


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