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dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Celine
dc.contributor.authorKiefe, Catarina I
dc.contributor.authorMorena, Alexandra L
dc.contributor.authorRahmoun, Mhd B
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSefair, Ana Vallejo
dc.contributor.authorBoudreaux, Edwin D
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-22T16:55:28Z
dc.date.available2024-01-22T16:55:28Z
dc.date.issued2023-12-21
dc.identifier.citationLarkin C, Kiefe CI, Morena AL, Rahmoun MB, Lazar P, Sefair AV, Boudreaux ED. Clinician Attitudes Toward Suicide Prevention Practices and Their Implementation: Findings From the System of Safety Study. Psychiatr Serv. 2023 Dec 21:appips20230082. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.20230082. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38124552.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1557-9700
dc.identifier.doi10.1176/appi.ps.20230082en_US
dc.identifier.pmid38124552
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/53000
dc.description.abstractObjective: The authors aimed to assess clinicians' attitudes toward suicide-related practices and their implementation, across roles and settings, before implementation of the Zero Suicide model in a health care system. Methods: Clinicians (N=5,559) were invited to complete a survey assessing demographic characteristics; confidence and self-reported suicide-related practice; leadership buy-in; and attitudes toward suicide prevention, safety planning, and continuous quality improvement (CQI). Results: Of 1,224 respondents, most felt confident conducting suicide screening but less confident performing other suicide-related care. Provider role and care setting were significantly associated with confidence (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis H test) and practice (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis H test) of providing suicide prevention care, with behavioral health providers and providers in the emergency department (ED) reporting the highest confidence. Attitudes toward safety planning were more positive among women (p<0.001, t test) and behavioral health providers (p<0.001, F test) than among their counterparts or peers. Positive attitudes toward CQI were significantly associated with male sex (p=0.01), non-White race (p=0.03), younger age (p=0.02), fewer years working in health care (p<0.001), administrative role (p<0.001), working in the ED (p<0.001), outpatient settings (p<0.02), and medical provider role (p<0.001). Conclusions: Behavioral health providers and those in the ED reported feeling prepared to deliver suicide-related care, with nurses feeling less confident and less supported. Initiatives to improve suicide-related care should account for clinical role and care setting during planning. CQI could help engage a broader range of clinicians in suicide-related care improvements.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatric Servicesen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.20230082en_US
dc.subjectEmergency psychiatryen_US
dc.subjectImplementation scienceen_US
dc.subjectResearchen_US
dc.subjectService deliveryen_US
dc.subjectSuicide and self-destructive behavioren_US
dc.titleClinician Attitudes Toward Suicide Prevention Practices and Their Implementation: Findings From the System of Safety Studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
dc.source.beginpageappips20230082
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalPsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
dc.contributor.departmentEmergency Medicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychiatryen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiostatistics and Health Services Researchen_US


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