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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Matthew A
dc.contributor.authorLoncar, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorKotin, Robert M
dc.contributor.authorGifford, Robert J
dc.date.accessioned2024-03-27T19:41:22Z
dc.date.available2024-03-27T19:41:22Z
dc.date.issued2022-11-29
dc.identifier.citationCampbell MA, Loncar S, Kotin RM, Gifford RJ. Comparative analysis reveals the long-term coevolutionary history of parvoviruses and vertebrates. PLoS Biol. 2022 Nov 29;20(11):e3001867. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3001867. PMID: 36445931; PMCID: PMC9707805.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1545-7885
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pbio.3001867en_US
dc.identifier.pmid36445931
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/53241
dc.description.abstractParvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) are small DNA viruses that cause numerous diseases of medical, veterinary, and agricultural significance and have important applications in gene and anticancer therapy. DNA sequences derived from ancient parvoviruses are common in animal genomes and analysis of these endogenous parvoviral elements (EPVs) has demonstrated that the family, which includes twelve vertebrate-specific genera, arose in the distant evolutionary past. So far, however, such "paleovirological" analysis has only provided glimpses into the biology of ancient parvoviruses and their long-term evolutionary interactions with hosts. Here, we comprehensively map EPV diversity in 752 published vertebrate genomes, revealing defining aspects of ecology and evolution within individual parvovirus genera. We identify 364 distinct EPV sequences and show these represent approximately 200 unique germline incorporation events, involving at least five distinct parvovirus genera, which took place at points throughout the Cenozoic Era. We use the spatiotemporal and host range calibrations provided by these sequences to infer defining aspects of long-term evolution within individual parvovirus genera, including mammalian vicariance for genus Protoparvovirus, and interclass transmission for genus Dependoparvovirus. Moreover, our findings support a model of virus evolution in which the long-term cocirculation of multiple parvovirus genera in vertebrates reflects the adaptation of each viral genus to fill a distinct ecological niche. Our findings show that efforts to develop parvoviruses as therapeutic tools can be approached from a rational foundation based on comparative evolutionary analysis. To support this, we published our data in the form of an open, extensible, and cross-platform database designed to facilitate the wider utilisation of evolution-related domain knowledge in parvovirus research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relationThis article is based on a previously available preprint in bioRxiv, https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.10.25.465781
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Biologyen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3001867en_US
dc.rightsCopyright: © 2022 Campbell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectMammalian genomicsen_US
dc.subjectParvovirusesen_US
dc.subjectViral evolutionen_US
dc.subjectAnimal phylogeneticsen_US
dc.subjectVertebratesen_US
dc.subjectViral genomicsen_US
dc.subjectPaleogeneticsen_US
dc.subjectMammalsen_US
dc.titleComparative analysis reveals the long-term coevolutionary history of parvoviruses and vertebratesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePLoS biology
dc.source.volume20
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpagee3001867
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited Kingdom
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalPLoS biology
refterms.dateFOA2024-03-27T19:41:23Z
dc.contributor.departmentHorae Gene Therapy Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentMicrobiology and Physiological Systemsen_US


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Copyright: © 2022 Campbell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2022 Campbell et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.