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dc.contributor.authorXu, Shu
dc.contributor.authorJesdale, William M
dc.contributor.authorDubé, Catherine E
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Natalia N
dc.contributor.authorMcPhillips, Emily A
dc.contributor.authorLapane, Kate L
dc.date.accessioned2024-04-26T18:43:14Z
dc.date.available2024-04-26T18:43:14Z
dc.date.issued2024-03-05
dc.identifier.citationXu S, Jesdale WM, Dubé CE, Nielsen NN, McPhillips EA, Lapane KL. Social engagement and cognitive impairment among nursing home residents: The role of sensory impairment. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2024 Mar 5;122:105397. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2024.105397. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38484670.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6976
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.archger.2024.105397en_US
dc.identifier.pmid38484670
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/53303
dc.description.abstractBackground and objectives: Using US national nursing home data, this cross-sectional study sought to evaluate 1) the association between lack of social engagement and level of cognitive impairment; and 2) the extent to which this association differs by hearing and visual impairment. Research design and methods: Our sample included 793,846 nursing home residents aged ≥ 50 years. The Index of Social Engagement was categorized as none/lower (0, 1, 2) or higher levels (3 through 6). Cognitive Performance Scale was grouped as intact/mild (0, 1, 2), moderate (3, 4), or severe (5, 6). Multinomial models provided adjusted odds ratio (aOR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) between none/lower social engagement and cognitive impairment. We estimated relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) to quantify the joint effects of social engagement and sensory impairment types. Results: Overall, 12.6 % had lower social engagement, 30.3 % had hearing impairment, and 40.3 % had visual impairment. Compared to residents with high social engagement, those with lower social engagement were more likely to have moderate/severe cognitive impairment (aORmoderate = 2.21, 95 % CI 2.17-2.26; aORsevere = 6.49, 95 % CI 6.24-6.74). The impact of low social engagement on cognitive impairment was more profound among residents with hearing impairment and/or visual impairment (RERIhearing = 3.89, 95 % CI 3.62-4.17; RERIvisual = 25.2, 95 % CI 23.9-26.6)). Discussion and implications: Residents with lower social engagement had higher levels of cognitive impairment. Residents with sensory impairments are potentially more susceptible to the negative impact of lower levels of social engagement on level of cognitive impairment.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Gerontology and Geriatricsen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2024.105397en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2024. Published by Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.subjectCognitionen_US
dc.subjectHearing impairmenten_US
dc.subjectLong term careen_US
dc.subjectSocial isolationen_US
dc.subjectVisual impairmenten_US
dc.subjectUMCCTS funding
dc.titleSocial engagement and cognitive impairment among nursing home residents: The role of sensory impairmenten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleArchives of gerontology and geriatrics
dc.source.volume122
dc.source.beginpage105397
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryNetherlands
dc.identifier.journalArchives of gerontology and geriatrics
dc.contributor.departmentMorningside Graduate School of Biomedical Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.studentNatalia N Nielsen


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