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dc.contributor.authorHsieh, Tien-Chan
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Yee Hui
dc.contributor.authorZou, Guangchen
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Chan
dc.contributor.authorAsh, Arlene S.
dc.date.accessioned2024-06-12T20:05:17Z
dc.date.available2024-06-12T20:05:17Z
dc.date.issued2024-05-27
dc.identifier.citationHsieh TC, Yeo YH, Zou G, Zhou C, Ash A. Disparities in Palliative Care Use for Patients With Blood Cancer Who Died in the Hospital. Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2024 May 27:10499091241254523. doi: 10.1177/10499091241254523. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 38803232.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1938-2715
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/10499091241254523en_US
dc.identifier.pmid38803232
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14038/53459
dc.description.abstractBackground: Palliative care can enhance quality of life during a terminal hospitalization. Despite advances in diagnostic and treatment tools, blood cancers lag behind solid malignancies in palliative use. It is not clear what factors affect palliative care use in blood cancer. Methods: We used the 2016 to 2019 National Inpatient Sample to identify demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with receiving palliative care among patients over age 18 with any malignant hematological diagnosis during a terminal hospitalization lasting at least 3 days, excluding those receiving a stem cell transplant. Results: Palliative care use was documented 54% of the time among 49,720 weighted cases (9944 distinct individual hospitalizations), approximately evenly distributed across the years 2016-2019. Palliative care use was lowest in 2016 (51%) and highest in 2018 (58%), and increased with age, reaching 58% for those 80 years and older. Men and women were similarly likely to receive care. Patients of Hispanic ethnicity and African Americans received less palliative care (47% and 49%, respectively), as did those insured by Medicaid (48%), and those admitted to small or rural hospitals (52% and 47%, respectively). Charges for hospitalizations with palliative care were 19% lower than for those without it. Conclusions: This study highlights disparities in palliative care use among blood-cancer patients who died in the hospital. It seems likely that many of the 46% who did not receive palliative care could have benefitted from it. Interventions are likely needed to achieve equitable access to ideal levels of palliative care services in late-stage blood cancer.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicineen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://doi.org/10.1177/10499091241254523en_US
dc.subjectblood canceren_US
dc.subjectdisparityen_US
dc.subjectend-of-life careen_US
dc.subjectpalliative careen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomic statusen_US
dc.subjectterminal hospitalizationen_US
dc.titleDisparities in Palliative Care Use for Patients With Blood Cancer Who Died in the Hospitalen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe American journal of hospice & palliative care
dc.source.beginpage10499091241254523
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.identifier.journalThe American journal of hospice & palliative care
dc.contributor.departmentBiostatistics and Health Services Researchen_US
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Centeren_US
dc.contributor.departmentMedicineen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation and Quantitative Health Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentProgram in Bioinformatics and Integrative Biologyen_US
dc.contributor.departmentRNA Therapeutics Instituteen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUMass Chan Analyticsen_US


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