ABOUT THIS COLLECTION

Psychiatry Information in Brief is a journal devoted to the dissemination of behavioral health information. This journal focuses on translating research findings into concise, user-friendly information that is accessible to all. It is is produced by the Implementation Science and Practice Advances Research Center (iSPARC) in the Department of Psychiatry at UMass Chan Medical School in Worcester, MA, USA. Read more about Psychiatry Information in Brief

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Contact Marsha Langer Ellison, UMass Chan Psychiatry - Implementation Science and Practice Advances Research Center, Marsha.Ellison@umassmed.edu with your questions.

Recently Published

  • Adulting Shorts: The “TEA” on IEPs Part 2

    Sudbrock, Emily; Gatesy-Davis, Marina (2022-09-21)
    This info-comic is for high school students to help them understand what an Individualized Educational Plan or IEP is, what transition planning is, and the importance of the student being involved in them. This is Part 2 of the story. Find Part 1 here: https://www.umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/publication/comic/2021/09/tea-on-ieps-part-1/
  • The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Clubhouse Model

    McKay, Colleen E.; Corcoran, Joel D (2022-06-29)
    The COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges to the traditional Clubhouse Model of Psychosocial Rehabilitation (Clubhouse). The COVID-19 pandemic forced many Clubhouses around the world to rapidly pivot from face-to-face services and support programs at the Clubhouse to hybrid or virtual services. The Clubhouse community quickly mobilized to establish new structures to maintain connections with Clubhouse members and provide them with essential supports. This brief describes adaptations that Clubhouses made during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also describe supports offered by Clubhouse International to inform their international network about innovative approaches and best practices for Clubhouses during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Advancing Employment for Secondary Learners with Disabilities through CTE Policy and Practice

    McKay, Colleen E.; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Narkewicz, Emma L (2022-04-28)
    The Data tables for the figures in Advancing Employment for Secondary Learners with Disabilities through CTE Policy and Practice brief are available to download under "Additional Files" below. The Strengthening Career and Technical Education (CTE) for the 21st Century Act (Perkins V, P.L. 115-224) provides new opportunities for states to serve learners with disabilities in CTE. Perkins V specifies that learners with special population status, including learners with disabilities, need to be prepared for high-wage, high-skill, in-demand employment opportunities or post-secondary education. Perkins V requires state and local leaders to describe how CTE will be made available to learners with special population status and provides flexible funding and policy levers to achieve that goal. Even though Perkins V is in the early stages of implementation (the law went into full effect on July 1, 2020), states can leverage facets of the new law to address the challenges of supporting CTE access and success among learners with disabilities. Perkins V emphasizes supporting learners with special population status, giving states an opportunity to: Build upon prior equity work to provide greater access to CTE among learners with disabilities. To restructure systems and policies to better support these learners. To explore how this opportunity has been used by states in their Perkin V plans, UMass Chan Medical School partnered with Advance CTE to survey State CTE Directors for secondary education. This brief summarizes survey results, provides state examples, and offers policy and programmatic considerations.
  • Creating Welcoming Environments for Workers with Disabilities: Managing Cognitive Demand

    Snethen, Gretchen; CeKTER, UMass Chan (2022-03-08)
    This comic is a collaboration between CeKTER and the Temple University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (ACL grant #’s 90RTCP0001 & # 90RT5021). It is based on work by Gretchen Snethen, PhD, CTRS and colleagues. The comic shows and example of how workers with disabilities can be supported at work. A transcript of the comic is available at https://www.umassmed.edu/globalassets/cekter/docs/transcripts/managing-cognitive-demand-transcript.html. A .png version of the comic is available for download.
  • How to Share Research about Education and Employment with the Deaf Community

    Pici-D’Ottavio, Emma; Wilkins, Alexander; Anderson, Melissa L. (2022-03-07)
    The U.S. Deaf community is a sociolinguistic minority group of at least 500,000 individuals who communicate using American Sign Language (ASL).1 ASL is fully distinct from English – i.e., it is not “English on the hands.” ASL is a natural, formal language with its own syntax, morphology, and structure. Members of the Deaf community identify as members of a cultural minority group with shared language, experience, history, art, and literature. This tip sheet focuses on best practices for sharing research findings with culturally Deaf individuals who primarily use ASL. However, many of the strategies described below align with principles for universal accessibility and will, therefore, apply to a diverse range of hearing people and people with hearing loss.
  • Adulting Shorts: The “TEA” on IEPS Part 1

    ACR, Transitions (2021-09-29)
    This info-comic is for high school students to help them understand what an Individualized Educational Plan or IEP is, what transition planning is, and the importance of the student being involved in them. This info-comic is based on work by the Translating Evidence to Support Transitions (TEST) team (NIDILRR Grant number 90DP0080). Find out more about this project on the project’s website. Read the Teens on IEPs tip sheet. Read the You Got This: Taking a Leadership Role in Your IEP Meeting tip sheet. Artwork by Marina Gatesy-Davis View the info-comic transcript.
  • Seven Tips Mental Health Care Providers Can Use to Address Patient Tobacco Use

    McKay, Colleen E. (2021-09-13)
    Approximately fifty million people living in the United States (U.S.) use tobacco. Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of disease and/or death in the U.S. People living with mental illness account for a disproportionate amount of tobacco use. Individuals living with mental health or substance use conditions consume almost half of all cigarettes sold in the U.S. People with schizophrenia are three to four times as likely to smoke as the general population. People living with mental illness also die prematurely compared to the general population and they and have a disproportionate number of tobacco-attributable deaths. Less than two-thirds of psychiatrists ask about tobacco use and screening for tobacco use is not standard practice in many community-based services for mental health. Despite this, approximately 70% of people living with mental illness who smoke say they would like to quit smoking. This tip sheet offers 7 tips to help your clients quit using tobacco.
  • 5 Simple Ways to Create More Accessible Social Media Content

    Wnuk, Jean (2021-07-22)
    Principles of accessibility are not limited to physical spaces (such as stairs or curbs) – the same principles apply to online content, including social media sites. If you are using social media as a channel to distribute your research and content, the following are reasons why your social media content should be made accessible: It is easy to do and the right thing to do This will increase access of your research to people with disabilities You will be abiding by Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) In this tip sheet we share with you five simple ways to make your social media posts as widely accessible as possible.
  • Emotional Support Animals: The Basics

    Gatesy-Davis, Anwyn (2021-07-20)
    An Emotional Support Animal (ESA) is an animal that provides therapeutic benefit (e.g., emotional support, comfort, companionship) to a person with a mental health or psychiatric disability (such as a serious mental health condition). An ESA is not considered a Service Animal, but under U.S. law, an emotional support animal is also not considered a pet and is generally not restricted by the type of animal.1, 2 Any domesticated animal may be considered as an ESA (e.g., cats, dogs, mice, rabbits, birds, hedgehogs, rats, minipigs, ferrets, etc.) and they can be any age. However, an ESA must be able to be manageable in public and does not create a nuisance. In this tip sheet we describe what an Emotional Support Animal is an is not as well as how someone can look into getting one. See also the companion tip sheet: Can I Bring My Emotional Support Animal to College with Me?
  • Can I Bring My Emotional Support Animal to College with Me?

    Gatesy-Davis, Anwyn (2021-07-20)
    Do you know that you can take your Emotional Support Animal (ESA) with you to college? The Fair Housing Act (FHA) says that “Housing providers cannot refuse to make reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices, or services when such accommodations may be necessary to afford a person with a disability the equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling.”3 This means that colleges and universities must allow ESAs in housing, even if there is a no-pet policy. Find out more about bringing your ESA to college with you in this tip sheet. 3 U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. (n.d.). Assistance animals. Retrieved from https://www.hud.gov/program_offices/fair_housing_equal_opp/assistance_animals See also the companion tip sheet: Emotional Support Animals: The Basics
  • Brain Injury Clubhouses

    McKay, Colleen E.; Young, Jason; Johnson, Cindi; Seel, Ronald T (2021-05-04)
    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reported that the number of people living with permanent disability from brain injury grows annually as medical technology has advanced in life saving techniques. However, community-based programs which enable brain injury survivors to live productive lives throughout the entire course of recovery have not grown proportionately to meet this the need. Brain Injury Clubhouses were developed to address the need for coordinated, long-term, community-based supports for brain survivors in a community-based setting. Brain Injury Clubhouses are designed to improve the lives of persons with ABI and reduce strain on caregivers and healthcare services The information in this research brief is designed to provide funders, administrators, policy makers, and other stakeholders with an overview of Brain Injury Clubhouses. The brief also provides outcomes associated with participation in a Brain Injury Clubhouse from a recent research study to provide stakeholders with a better understanding of Brain Injury Clubhouses.
  • Accessibility 101: A Researcher’s Guide to Making Content Accessible

    Murray, Alexandra (2021-04-29)
    What is accessibility? Accessibility refers to whether a product or service is usable by all regardless of disability status. Principles of accessibility are not limited to physical spaces (such as stairs or curbs) – the same principles apply to websites and public facing documents. There are guidelines to follow to make documents, web pages, presentations, products, and research findings more accessible to people with disabilities. This tip sheet offers an introduction to accessibility and will be followed by tip sheets that focus on specifics. Visit the CeKTER website.
  • Ways to Mind Your Mental Health in Challenging Times: Tips for Youth [English and Spanish versions]

    Larkin, Celine (2021-04-02)
    The isolation that youth and young adults have faced during the COVID-19 pandemic has negatively impacted their mental health. This tip sheet offers some ideas and supports that youth and young adults can use to connect with others and help them feel better. A Spanish translation of this publication is available for download. See our related COVID-19 products on our website at https://umassmed.edu/TransitionsACR/coronavirus/.
  • Top Tips for Running a Virtual Advisory Board [English, Spanish, Portuguese, and Mandarin versions]

    Larkin, Celine; Logan, Deirdre G.; Anderson, Melissa L. (2020-12-16)
    In this tip sheet, the iSPARC Stakeholder Engagement Program offers advice on how to run an advisory council virtually. It also talks about some of the benefits of having your council meet virtually. Spanish, Portuguese and Mandarin translations of this publication are available for download. Learn more about the iSPARC Stakeholder Engagement Program at https://umassmed.edu/sparc/isparccenters/engaging-the-mental-health-community-in-research/.
  • Adulting Is Hard: Understanding the College-to-Career Transition and Supporting Young Adults’ Emotional Wellbeing

    Golden, Laura; Moser, Jade; Vella-Riplee, Aimee; MacPhee, John; Schwartz, Victor; Levin, Len; Biebel, Kathleen (2020-12-09)
    The transition from college to career includes many challenges, such as adjusting to a professional environment, the high costs of student loan repayment and independent living, and changes in social support networks. Many of these challenges affect a young person’s emotional wellbeing; however, limited attention has been paid in the literature or at the practice level to the emotional wellbeing of college graduates as they transition from college to career. To address this underrecognized issue, investigators from The Jed Foundation (JED), a leading nonprofit organization with a mission to protect the emotional health and prevent suicide among teens and young adults, and the Transitions to Adulthood Center for Research (Transitions ACR) at the University of Massachusetts Medical School collaborated on a study to better understand the experiences of young adults during the college-to-career transition and how these experiences effect emotional wellbeing. Download the full College to Career: Supporting Mental Health report here.
  • Partnering with Community Agencies in Transition Planning for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    Huckabee, Sloan; Golden, Laura; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Biebel, Kathleen (2020-11-30)
    Young adults with mental health difficulties are capable of successfully engaging in school, training, and employment. The support these individuals receive as they progress through secondary education can help them realize their potential in life after high school. Many times teachers see different results for these students such as high school drop-out, lower rates of post-secondary education and employment, and even higher rates of involvement with law enforcement, poverty, and homelessness upon their exit from high school; however, with the right information, resources, and determination teachers can make a lasting impact on these students. To help students with emotional disturbance (ED) to obtain post-secondary success, teachers need resources to assist them with planning and preparing for students’ transition from high school into education and training programs and employment in young adulthood. This practice guide will offer practical ways to plan for these students’ successful transition from high school to post-secondary life, which can lead to positive outcomes for students with ED. To learn more about the Translating Evidence to Support Transitions project, please visit our website.
  • Incorporating Career and Technical Education in Transition Planning for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    Ellison, Marsha Langer; Huckabee, Sloan; Golden, Laura; Biebel, Kathleen (2020-11-30)
    Young adults with mental health difficulties are capable of successfully engaging in school, training, and employment. The support these individuals receive as they progress through secondary education can help them realize their potential in life after high school. Many times teachers see different results for these students such as high school drop-out, lower rates of post-secondary education and employment, and even higher rates of involvement with law enforcement, poverty, and homelessness upon their exit from high school (Wagner, Newman, Cameto, & Levine); however, with the right information, resources, and determination teachers can make a lasting impact on these students. To help students with Emotional Disturbance (ED) experience post-secondary success, teachers need resources to assist them with planning and preparing for student transition from high school into education and training programs and employment in young adulthood. This guide will offer practical ways to plan for these students’ successful transition from high school to post-secondary life, which can lead to positive outcomes for students with ED. To learn more about the Translating Evidence to Support Transitions project, visit our website.
  • Supporting Student-Led Transition Planning for Students with Emotional Disturbance

    Biebel, Kathleen; Golden, Laura; Huckabee, Sloan; Ellison, Marsha Langer (2020-11-30)
    Young adults with mental health difficulties are capable of successfully engaging in school, training, and employment. The support these individuals receive as they progress through secondary education can help them realize their potential in life after high school. Many times, teachers see different results for these students such as high school drop-out, lower rates of post-secondary education and employment, and even higher rates of involvement with law enforcement, poverty, and homelessness upon their exit from high school; however, with the right information, resources, and determination teachers can make a lasting impact on these students. To help students with emotional disturbance experience post-secondary success, teachers need resources to assist them with planning and preparing for students’ transition from high school into education and training programs and employment in young adulthood. This practice guide will offer practical ways to plan for these students’ successful transition from high school to post-secondary life, which can lead to positive outcomes for students with emotional disturbance. Learn more about the Translating Evidence to Support Transitions project on our website.
  • Resiliency and the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Hidden Strengths of Those with Lived Experience of Mental Health Conditions

    Leahy-Lind, Sharon; Simons, Gillian (2020-11-04)
    To keep the spread of the novel coronavirus down people are asked to continue following social distancing guidelines, which can impact employment and feelings of connectedness. Many people have not seen loved ones in-person for months. These are all very difficult on one’s mental health. Building or strengthening resiliency can help one adapt to the new challenges each of us are facing. We can look to persons with lived experience of mental health conditions as examples of how to develop resiliency.
  • Promoting the Health of Parents & Children: Addressing Perinatal Mental Health by Building Medical Provider Capacity Through Perinatal Psychiatry Access Programs

    Byatt, Nancy; Bergman, Aaron; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Forkey, Heather; Griffin, Jessica L.; Moore Simas, Tiffany A. (2020-11-03)
    Mental health conditions are the most common obstetric complications of the perinatal period, impacting 1 in 5 individuals during pregnancy and the year following pregnancy. Perinatal mental health (PMH) conditions have deleterious effects on the health of perinatal individuals and their children, and are a leading and preventable cause of maternal mortality. Nevertheless, PMH conditions are underrecognized, underdiagnosed, and undertreated. To address these gaps, Massachusetts created the Massachusetts Child Psychiatry Access Program (MCPAP) for Moms to build the capacity of frontline medical providers to address PMH conditions by providing education, consultation, and resources and referrals. MCPAP for Moms has emerged as a successful and scalable model with at least 25 states or organizations implementing or developing similar Perinatal Psychiatry Access Programs. This report summarizes the Perinatal Psychiatry Access Program model and its individual and national impact.

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